Vacation Time

July 9, 2013

Cabin2013Having just returned from a week at our cabin in the Adirondak Mountains of New York, I thought it would be nice to share how things have changed for me since our last extended stay in 2011. It's important to understand that our cabin, although I love it, is not for everyone. No running water, no electricity, no cell phone coverage; it's basically a wooden tent. The kids have wooden bunks, and my husband and I sleep on a futon. I cook on a two burner gas camp stove and anything that needs to be “refrigerated” goes in the cooler.

 

This year was unexpectedly wet. (My husband, in 45 years of going to the camp, never remembers it being so wet.) So there were changes in how we “lived”. We could not use the buried cooler as it was full of water, leaving us with one cooler for everything. Boots were required at all times, no running to the outhouse at midnight in my slippers. On day three, for our first outing, we went to Fort Ticonderoga. Upon returning we left the truck at the top of the hill fearing the truck would get stuck if we tried to go up the hill one more time and hiked down to the cabin.

 

Each day thereafter, when we went somewhere, we would hike up and down the hill. What's amazing about this is that I never became winded hiking the ½ mile trail. (Two years ago I could barely make it up the hill to visit our neighbor.) I hiked a mile down to the river and didn't fall once. In the previous 11 years, I have NEVER made it to the river without falling in the mud at least once. I pulled canoes in and out of the water by myself. (The extra water was helpful there!) At the Adirondack Museum, I climbed the fire tower (last time I sat out that adventure). I even carved out an hour on the 4th of July to go running while the kids played at the beach. I have to say running in the Adirondack Mountains makes me appreciate the rolling hills of Virginia.

 

Cabin2011My children are as surefooted as my husband when we hike at the cabin (I'm convinced it's their Native American blood from the father's side) and I'm still the cautious slow-poke bringing up the rear. However, I'm impressed at how my balance improved and apprehension about stepping on a log or in the mud has diminished. Not sure if it's psychological or physical, but I like it either way! Our entire vacation involved walking or hiking and I loved every minute of it. Not once did I need to stop or hold up the rest because I physically couldn't go any farther (my knees and ankles never hurt).

 

As fun as spending time at the cabin is, it is also nice to return to civilization (air conditioning, computers, etc.) and get back into my regular routine. Day 1 of our return, I ran five miles, logged my food on my app, and did a ton of laundry. My eating was a bit off while on vacation, lots of protein bars and not much else. It feels good to be back in a routine.

 

Issues with my ulcer (that was found in March) returned last month. So I head back to the hospital for another test this week. It's frustrating to feel punished for being successful at weight loss and scary to not know what's causing the ulcer. But I continue to do what my medical team tells me and hope there is a solution. More on this next time...

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Vacation Time
Vacation Time

Having just returned from a week at our cabin in the Adirondak Mountains of New York,...

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Vacation Time
Vacation Time

Having just returned from a week at our cabin in the Adirondak Mountains of New York,...